Mixed Rags & Recycling: Who Profits?

Mixed Rags & Recycling: Who Profits?

“When someone throws a recycleable in the trash, it may end up in a landfill forever. Does the amount of trash in your neighborhood make your head spin? A strong commitment to recycling will in many ways benefit you, your community, and the environment.”

Recycling is a $500 billion global industry, and according to the NY Post, “likely employs more people than any other industry on Earth except agriculture.” It is unclear from the source whether these number include textile recycling, including the mixed rags and credential clothing industry. Still, $500 billion globally is an astounding number! Hundreds of companies exist for the express purpose of reusing, reshaping, renewing, and repurposing existing materials in an effort to preserve virgin resources.

Aside from these companies, who profits from recycling? We found this infographic that explains very clearly who (and what) really profits from recycling:

Mixed Rags & Recycling: Who Profits?
via recyclingbin.com

Communities profit: Chemical runoff from landfills is reduced. Businesses profit: Recycling helps businesses stay profitable while preserving virgin resources. Cities and towns profit: Carbon dioxide emissions are significantly reduced. The countryside profits: Animals are not in danger of ingesting dangerous chemicals or bits of plastic. Marine life profits: Plastic floating in the ocean is a danger to marine life.

In other words, every one and every thing on planet earth profits (or, in other words, benefit) from recycling. And while this infographic doesn’t mention mixed rags or other textiles specifically, the benefits still apply. When you throw away your used clothing or shoes, they go to a landfill where they can take hundreds of years to break down.  When you donate used shoes or clothing, others have a chance to use them. When you recycle your worn out clothing and used shoes, they can be made into new products instead of taking up space in a landfill. Your used clothes and shoes still have value beyond their wearability.